New meaning to term ‘historic preservation’

themcguiresisters

I thought I was hallucinating.  While channel surfing the other night I caught a segment on public television featuring The McGuire Sisters singing “Sincerely.”  Remember that tune?  Remember that trio?

mcguiresisters Well, honey.  They look better today than they did 60 years ago!  (I guess I listened to them from my playpen.)

How can this be? Check them out at left in 1949 when they began their rise to fame while singing at army hospitals around the country.

See what I mean?  They had to be at least 20 then, which would make them approaching 80 now!

Good Lord, I want the name of their cereal, make-up line. vitamin regimen,  and plastic surgeon. The only thing I can think of is that they must have never married or had children because they haven’t aged at all.  Dorian Gray comes to mind.  He’s that fictional character who grew younger rather than older.

They also sang “Sugar in the morning, sugar in the evening, sugar at suppertime.” The memories came flooding back of Saturday nights watching Lawrence Welk and Hit Parade with my parents while polishing my Mary Jane’s for church.  And I’m thinking, what happened to me?  These chicks could pass as my grandchildren!

Did anyone else out catch this show?  Maybe I dreamed it.  But I found the current photo on line and they are wearing the same frocks they had on in my “dream.”

4 thoughts on “New meaning to term ‘historic preservation’

  1. Hey – I looked them up — the oldest is 83 so I am with you – I want to know their day-to-day habits so that I can mimic them!

  2. I saw this too, but I also noticed that they never really got a close up of them. Wigs and make-up can make anybody look good. They still sound good, though.

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